Discipulus invitus

Ina is our resident master gardener which means she actually got schooled in the art of cultivation, while the rest of us either learned through experience – or we fake it.

Ina_California1

She creates beautiful gardens, but always refers to a plant by its latin or botanical name. I have no idea what she is saying.

Centaurea cineraria

Butterfly-Thistle2_5_13

I think she believes that if she repeats the name often enough, I will eventually catch on.

Physostegia virginiana

Obedient_Summer

I just nod. Politely.

Asclepias tuberose

Butterfly-Weed

I have discovered that I am much more inspired to learn the latin names of dogs than flowers. Don’t ask me why. For example:

Lipidus smoochus

Bridget-Kisser

Minus dontouchus

BoBo-Guarding

Toobigus forlapus

Brutus-post

Feelgoodus dontstopus

Dusty-Post

See what I mean? Much more memorable.

Meus happius

Gus-11_1_13

29 comments

  1. Carol

    This just started my day off wonderfully. Thank you for all the smiles and beautiful pictures of some of the dogs. Thank you!

  2. Thank you for the chuckle and beautiful photos. I attended a school where they taught Latin but never had any interest. Then a nice long break where no one spoke Latin to me until I became a Master Gardener and there we go again with the Latin names. But, one thing about being in that special mature age bracket you get to make some choices and I choose to just call plants by their common name. To be honest it isn’t a choice because I’m taking a stand it is because I just plain can’t remember the Latin names. BUT, my hat is tipped to your friend, Ina, and all of my gardening friends who can remember the Latin names. πŸ™‚

  3. I have not been trained as a MG, but the Latin names of plants and flowers came more easily to me than their “common” names, maybe because of all the Latin in my schooling from childhood on…funny how I pictured each of the plants you named…but I have to say that YOUR Latin is more creative and descriptive! Thank you for this, Ogee; what a lovely day’s beginning!

  4. Sara and Oscar

    Those Latin dog names are fabulous! So cute, thanks for the laugh! But my Snoringus Sleepydoginus didn’t even wake up when I laughed at it just now πŸ™‚

  5. “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”

    The roots of the word have been defined as follows: super- “above”, cali- “beauty”, fragilistic- “delicate”, expiali- “to atone”, and docious- “educable”, with the sum of these parts signifying roughly “Atoning for educability through delicate beauty.”
    It is defined as “something to say when you have nothing to say”.

    Thank you — that word covers all of the above.

  6. bandchiggins

    “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”

    The roots of the word have been defined as follows: super- “above”, cali- “beauty”, fragilistic- “delicate”, expiali- “to atone”, and docious- “educable”, with the sum of these parts signifying roughly “Atoning for educability through delicate beauty.”
    It is defined as “something to say when you have nothing to say”.

    Thank you. We just love this one and words cannot describe this blog.
    Carol and Maggie

  7. Selim

    I just want to commend Ina on the AMAZING job she’s done with the garden. Her knowledge, vision, hard work, and cheerful personality have been a gift to us all. Thanks, Ina!!

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